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Ray Goldsworthy deaf music cochlear implant
Raymond Goldworthy was one of the first children in the United States to receive a cochlear implant in 1988 and later went on to become a scientist dedicated to helping the hearing impaired. (Photo/Ricardo Carrasco III)

Scientist wants to help the hearing impaired gain access to music

A cochlear implant helped Ray Goldsworthy regain his hearing. Now, he’ll use his research — and a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health — to help others with implants connect to music.

ArtsScience/Technology
Assal Habibi musical training brain development
Assal Habibi has done extensive research on how musical training is beneficial for brain development. Her latest study focuses on children who are learning music and speak more than one language, as compared to children who know just one language. (USC Photo/Gus Ruelas)

USC research reinforces music’s impact on the developing brain

A $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health will help USC Dornsife’s Assal Habibi advance her studies into how musical training boosts childhood brain development.

ArtsUniversity
Rob Perkins USC music programming
USC Thornton alum Rob Perkins has built a thriving career as a contractor, regularly putting over 100 musicians with their own links to USC to work every month. (Photo/Courtesy of Robert Perkins)

For this USC Thornton graduate, the music business is all about family

After years on the road with artists like Michael Bublé, Rob Perkins started a curated music programming business called On the Beat that is fueled by fellow USC Thornton grads, faculty and even current students.

ArtsScience/Technology
USC researchers how do people beatbox
Beatboxing originated in 1970s New York, coinciding with the genesis of hip-hop: The high cost of rhythm machines, or “beatboxes,“ led musicians to start creating their own rhythms with what was freely available –– their mouths. (Illustration/Dennis Lan)

Unpacking the mysteries of beatboxing: Linguists and engineers team up

Beatboxers expertly manipulate their vocal tracts to make sounds unknown in any language. Through the use of cutting-edge MRIs, USC researchers plan to find out how they do it.