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Editor's Picks

Arts
Judith Shelton stand-up comedy teacher
Students in Judith Shelton‘s class are expected to do comedy in front of their peers at every meeting to help them get over their insecurities, but also to discover what works for them. They also do a real set in front of a live audience at a comedy club as part of the class. (Photo/Courtesy of Judith Shelton)

Stand-up comedy lecturer reassures students that failure is part of the routine

As both a comedian and a teacher, Judith Shelton encourages her students at the USC School of Dramatic Arts to take risks and celebrate their imperfections.

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Science/Technology
Plasticity sustainable video game
Students from the USC School of Cinematic Arts teamed up with USC Dornsife’s Environmental Studies program to create Plasticity, which encourages players to make more sustainable choices. (Image/Courtesy of Aimee Zhang)

By asking players to revitalize a dying Earth, this video game aims to raise environmental awareness

A USC Dornsife environmental studies professor and two USC student game designers believe that their game Plasticity could inspire people to take sustainable action.

Health
neuroimaging schizophrenia
Researchers used a series of advanced techniques developed at the USC INI to measure and map the shape and volume of various brain structures. (Image/Courtesy of the USC Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute)

World’s largest study of a rare genetic disorder offers new insights on schizophrenia

USC researchers are investigating 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a genetic disorder linked to schizophrenia, in an effort to find a biomarker of the serious mental illness.

Health
child loss USC study
A recent study found that the burden of bereavement after the death of a child is much greater than previously thought, opening the door to new conversations on global inequality. (Illustration/Gabriela Froehlich, Shutterstock)

The death of a child is a devastatingly common experience for many African mothers

By their late 40s, nearly two-thirds of women in sub-Saharan Africa have lost a child, according to a USC study. Researchers are increasingly recognizing bereavement as a public health threat.