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Science/Technology
Plasticity sustainable video game
Students from the USC School of Cinematic Arts teamed up with USC Dornsife’s Environmental Studies program to create Plasticity, which encourages players to make more sustainable choices. (Image/Courtesy of Aimee Zhang)

By asking players to revitalize a dying Earth, this video game aims to raise environmental awareness

A USC Dornsife environmental studies professor and two USC student game designers believe that their game Plasticity could inspire people to take sustainable action.

Science/Technology
Juan Pablo de los Rios Rio Grande pollution
Juan Pablo de los Rios is a chemistry graduate student in Professor Megan Fieser's lab, which is focused on tackling the plastics polluting our oceans. (USC Photo/Mike Glier)

Polluted river sparks first-gen student’s dreams of environmental change

Juan Pablo de los Rios grew up on both the Mexican and American sides of the Rio Grande, which became a dumping ground for toxic waste. As a chemistry grad student at USC Dornsife, he hopes to one day clean that river and others like it.

HealthScience/Technology
antibiotic-resistant genes in recycled wastewater
As water shortages continue to increase, researchers are searching for ways to improve wastewater recycling. (Photo/Daria Shevtsova, Pexels)

Antibiotic-resistant genes are well removed by purification used to recycle wastewater but final quality is influenced by environmental factors

A team led by USC Viterbi’s Adam Smith has found that purified water returned to Southern California aquifers for storage and reuse blends with antibiotic-resistant bacteria already found in the aquifer.

Science/Technology
Marlink underwater communications
Maria Camasmie, Siena Applebaum, Roxanna Pakkar, Celeste Goodwin and Sofia Tavella, from left, started a company called Marlink which is developing underwater wireless communication technology. (Photo/Tracy + David Stills and Motion)

USC Viterbi startup wants to expand underwater exploration through wireless communication

A team of USC Viterbi undergraduates will bring their underwater wireless communication technology to the finals of a global student competition.

Science/Technology
kilauea algae
Scientists initially noticed that ocean water around the volcano was turning green by looking at NASA‘s satellite photos of the eruption. The green color turned out to be chlorophyll from the algae bloom. (Photo/U.S. Coast Guard)

1 billion tons of lava spark algae bloom in North Pacific Ocean

Not only did the Kīlauea volcano pour tons upon tons of lava into the ocean last year, but its eruption set off an unusual effect: an algae super bloom. USC Dornsife researchers found out why.