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Duet student startup refugee giving
The team that built Duet identified refugee families who were willing to share their stories, worked with a small network of family-owned stores willing to sign up, and coded and developed the app. (Photo/Courtesy of Spence Blood)

In a season of giving, this student startup is transforming how we think about philanthropy

Duet — a student-built microphilanthropy startup — looks to connect donors with refugees and their family-owned stores in a more personalized and dignified way.

Science/Technology
air pollution monitoring and babies
When air pollution levels are high, a smartphone app developed by USC researchers will suggest actions to reduce exposure levels, such as recirculating air in the car or taking a suggested alternative driving route to reduce exposures. (Illustration/iStock)

How harmful is air pollution to developing brains? New study will assess its effects

A wristband-app combination — developed by USC Viterbi and the Keck School of Medicine of USC — will monitor prenatal exposure to harmful gases and suggest strategies to keep newborn brains safe.

Science/Technology
Cary Frydman neurofinance professor
Cary Frydman created the first classes in neurofinance offered at USC Marshall. The new field combines knowledge from neuroscience and psychology to better understand constraints on economic decisions. (Photo/Courtesy of Cary Frydman)

Through neurofinance, students can unlock how our brains drive certain financial choices

Cary Frydman, an associate professor at USC Marshall, describes how this emerging field can explain financial decision-making and influence economic policy.

Science/Technology
Ray Goldsworthy deaf music cochlear implant
Raymond Goldworthy was one of the first children in the United States to receive a cochlear implant in 1988 and later went on to become a scientist dedicated to helping the hearing impaired. (Photo/Ricardo Carrasco III)

Scientist wants to help people with hearing loss gain access to music

A cochlear implant helped Ray Goldsworthy regain his hearing. Now, he’ll use his research — and a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health — to help others with implants connect to music.

Science/Technology
AI bias natural language generation
USC experts analyzed a natural language generation system and found more frequent manifestations of bias against women, black people and gay people than men, white people and straight people. (Illustration/iStock)

As AI moves into content creation, researchers aim to battle its biases

AI systems like natural language generation are only as good as the data that trains them, and USC Viterbi experts want to uncover why and how that data can be biased against women and minorities.