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Health
child loss USC study
A recent study found that the burden of bereavement after the death of a child is much greater than previously thought, opening the door to new conversations on global inequality. (Illustration/Gabriela Froehlich, Shutterstock)

The death of a child is a devastatingly common experience for many African mothers

By their late 40s, nearly two-thirds of women in sub-Saharan Africa have lost a child, according to a USC study. Researchers are increasingly recognizing bereavement as a public health threat.

University
mass shooting survivors USC course
Ivy Schamis, a history teacher from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, talks to USC Annenberg students about the mass shooting at her school. (USC Photo/Olivia Mowry)

New USC Annenberg course gives the survivors of mass shootings a voice

Inspired by the USC Shoah Foundation’s video interviews, two Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists are documenting the stories of mass shooting survivors while also teaching young reporters how to cover traumatic events.

Health
Alzheimer's drug USC
In this image taken from tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient, the large pink-and-blue plaque on the lower right contains the abnormal protein amyloid. Also seen are several neurofibrillary tangles (smaller blue areas). Both of these abnormalities disrupt the normal working of the brain. (Image/Simon Fraser, Science Source)

Alzheimer’s study aims to see if drug can block brain plaques linked to disease

Keck School of Medicine of USC is launching a large clinical trial that targets amyloid plaques in the brain. The goal: to see whether a drug can clear or slow this plaque in people who have early Alzheimer’s or who appear clinically normal.

Science/Technology
AI animals how we define humanity
USC Dornsife anthropologist Tok Thompson believes that an evolving understanding of the world around us could lead to a new definition of the term “humanity.” (Image/iStock)

As our understanding of intelligence evolves, is it time to redefine ‘humanity’?

A USC Dornsife anthropologist says that the increasing acumen of artificial intelligence — along with new knowledge of plant and animal behavior — are challenging how we perceive the concept of being human.