USC News

Menu Search
University

USC dedicates quiet rock garden in honor of university’s Nisei students

The contemplative space off Trousdale Parkway commemorates the Japanese American students who were forced into detention centers right after the U.S. entered World War II.

Touring the Nisei rock garden
Family, friends, faculty students and staff tour the newly dedicated Nisei rock garden. (USC Photo/Gus Ruelas)

In a quiet corner of an otherwise bustling campus, USC on Friday dedicated a rock garden to honor the university’s Nisei students, the Japanese American students who were forced into detention centers right after the U.S. entered World War II.

Rock garden honors Nisei students

The garden provides a peaceful place for reflection. (USC Photo/Gus Ruelas)

The garden, near the north end of Trousdale Parkway beside the USC Amy King Dundon-Berchtold University Club at King Stoops Hall, provides a peaceful place for reflection.

The garden was approved by President Carol L. Folt just after she agreed to grant posthumous honorary degrees to USC’s Nisei students early last fall. Family members of USC Nisei students will be present for the dedication ceremony.

“The Nisei students are a part of USC,” said Calvin Abe, the renowned landscape architect who designed the garden. “The garden is a place to relax and reconsider what happened in the past, an expression of perseverance and hope.”

Ron Mackovich-Rodriguez of USC University Communications contributed to this report.

Rock garden honors Nisei students

The new garden, next to the USC Amy King Dundon-Berchtold University Club at King Stoops Hall, honors the Japanese American students who were forced into detention centers right after the U.S. entered World War II. (USC Photo/Gus Ruelas)

More stories about: , ,

USC dedicates quiet rock garden in honor of university’s Nisei students

Top stories on USC News