USC News

Menu Saturday, November 28, 2020 68° Clear Search

Editor's Picks

more editor's picks

Health
Alzheimer's drug USC
In this image taken from tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient, the large pink-and-blue plaque on the lower right contains the abnormal protein amyloid. Also seen are several neurofibrillary tangles (smaller blue areas). Both of these abnormalities disrupt the normal working of the brain. (Image/Simon Fraser, Science Source)

Restricted blood flow in the brain could be tied to Alzheimer’s

A USC research team has found strong evidence that keeping blood vessels healthy can help prevent cognitive decline.

Health
epigenetics and child abuse
USC researchers are studying the mental health symptoms of young adults who were abused or neglected as children as it relates to their genetic expression dealing with current stressors, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. (Illustration/iStock)

A new approach to determining whether child abuse magnifies COVID mental health risk

The result could increase understanding of who is at greater risk in the context of the pandemic and who may benefit most from enhanced and targeted interventions.

University
Jean Wade Rindlaub
Jean Wade Rindlaub devoted her advertising talents convincing women that they should prioritize domesticity over a career — until her views underwent a radical shift. (Photo/ Courtesy of the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University)

Exploring the evolution — and contradictions — of an early female ad exec

USC’s Ellen Wayland-Smith chronicles the life of Jean Wade Rindlaub, who used her influential career on Madison Avenue to advocate that women stay in the kitchen.