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HealthUniversity
Dental hygiene students work alongside DDS students
Dental hygiene student Alisha Lee teaches dental students Cindy Tashiro and Taylor Purks different brushing methods. As part of the curriculum change, dental hygiene students work alongside dental students in the clinic. (Photo/Hannah Benet)

USC’s dental hygiene program transforms to serve a new generation of students

The Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC has reshaped its dental hygiene program to focus more on collaboration, adapt to new technology and better prepare graduates for an ever-evolving world.

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Science/Technology
air pollution monitoring and babies
When air pollution levels are high, a smartphone app developed by USC researchers will suggest actions to reduce exposure levels, such as recirculating air in the car or taking a suggested alternative driving route to reduce exposures. (Illustration/iStock)

How harmful is air pollution to developing brains? New study will assess its effects

A wristband-app combination — developed by USC Viterbi and the Keck School of Medicine of USC — will monitor prenatal exposure to harmful gases and suggest strategies to keep newborn brains safe.

Science/Technology
Cary Frydman neurofinance professor
Cary Frydman created the first classes in neurofinance offered at USC Marshall. The new field combines knowledge from neuroscience and psychology to better understand constraints on economic decisions. (Photo/Courtesy of Cary Frydman)

Through neurofinance, students can unlock how our brains drive certain financial choices

Cary Frydman, an associate professor at USC Marshall, describes how this emerging field can explain financial decision-making and influence economic policy.

Science/Technology
Ray Goldsworthy deaf music cochlear implant
Raymond Goldworthy was one of the first children in the United States to receive a cochlear implant in 1988 and later went on to become a scientist dedicated to helping the hearing impaired. (Photo/Ricardo Carrasco III)

Scientist wants to help people with hearing loss gain access to music

A cochlear implant helped Ray Goldsworthy regain his hearing. Now, he’ll use his research — and a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health — to help others with implants connect to music.

Science/Technology
AI bias natural language generation
USC experts analyzed a natural language generation system and found more frequent manifestations of bias against women, black people and gay people than men, white people and straight people. (Illustration/iStock)

As AI moves into content creation, researchers aim to battle its biases

AI systems like natural language generation are only as good as the data that trains them, and USC Viterbi experts want to uncover why and how that data can be biased against women and minorities.

ArtsScience/Technology
Assal Habibi musical training brain development
Assal Habibi has done extensive research on how musical training is beneficial for brain development. Her latest study focuses on children who are learning music and speak more than one language, as compared to children who know just one language. (USC Photo/Gus Ruelas)

USC research reinforces music’s impact on the developing brain

A $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health will help USC Dornsife’s Assal Habibi advance her studies into how musical training boosts childhood brain development.

Arts
Inda Craig-Galvan
Inda Craig-Galván has done sketch comedy at The Second City and The Groundlings, has a Black Theater Alliance Award & Joseph Jefferson Award nomination, wrote for The Rookie, edited How To Get Away With Murder in addition to being a playwright. (Photo/Courtesy of Inda Craig-Galván)

Whether writing plays or TV dramas, this USC alum embraces her voice

Inda Craig-Galván, who has worked as both an acclaimed playwright and a TV writer, credits her master’s from the USC School of Dramatic Arts with opening her eyes to new writing opportunities.