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Jenesse Miller

Jenesse Miller is a senior communications manager with the USC Price School of Public Policy and a former media relations specialist with USC University Communications. She previously worked in communications for health and environment organizations, and earned a Master’s in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley.

Stories by Jenesse Miller:

1992 Los Angeles uprising: Skyline today
Thirty years later, the beating of Rodney King and the shooting death of Latasha Harlins continue to reverberate in Los Angeles and throughout the country. (Photo/iStock)

‘Like a stick of dynamite’: USC scholars reflect on legacy of 1992 L.A. uprising and police beating of Rodney King

USC experts remember the events that led up to the violence and protests, and consider more recent violence against Blacks including George Floyd and Eric Garner and fatal confrontations between vigilantes and Black citizens.

Women's athletics and Title IX: Julie Rousseau
Julie Rousseau spreads the word about the Women of Troy, an affinity group within the athletic department devoted to promoting and developing USC’s renowned women’s athletics program. (Photo/Courtesy of Julie Rousseau)

The Women of Troy: How USC’s female student-athletes are using their voices and making history

As Women’s History Month wraps up and the 50th anniversary of Title IX approaches, USC Athletics’ Julie Rousseau discusses the role of women student-athletes in the fight for equality. 

New alzheimer's drug: Man reading newspaper
USC researchers have found older Americans most at risk for Alzheimer’s know little about aducanumab, despite the fact that an overwhelming majority of survey respondents said they were worried about Alzheimer’s disease. (Photo/iStock)

Study finds older Americans are largely unaware of new Alzheimer’s drug

Among older Americans surveyed in the weeks after FDA approval of aducanumab, few could correctly answer true or false questions about the first new Alzheimer’s drug in decades.

Diverse hands
The research team identified all sources of income and benefits for families, studied eligibility requirements of each and combined them to estimate the total resource families have available. Next, they compared a family’s total resources to the estimated basic living costs for Los Angeles. (Photo/Pixabay)

Social safety net can become a web for low-income L.A. families who start to earn more

USC researchers say increased transparency and more robust benefits for low-income families are needed — particularly when it comes to housing — even after their wages go up to help avoid “plateaus” and “cliffs.”