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Emily Gersema

Emily Gersema

Emily Gersema is the assistant director of media relations at USC University Communications. Before joining USC, she worked as a media strategy and social media consultant, and was an investigative journalist.

Stories by Emily Gersema:

cell receptor obesity
A discovery by Ray Stevens of the Bridge Institute at the USC MIchelson Center for Convergent Bioscience may lead to new or better treatments for patients with obesity. They've configured a key cell receptor that is the likely target for new therapies. (Illustration/Yekaterina Kadyshevskaya)

Better obesity treatments may lie ahead after discovery of key protein structure

An international team of scientists, led by Raymond Stevens of USC’s Bridge Institute, is investigating a protein in the brain that will likely be the target of improved obesity therapies.

Assal Habibi musical training brain development
Assal Habibi has done extensive research on how musical training is beneficial for brain development. Her latest study focuses on children who are learning music and speak more than one language, as compared to children who know just one language. (USC Photo/Gus Ruelas)

USC research reinforces music’s impact on the developing brain

A $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health will help USC Dornsife’s Assal Habibi advance her studies into how musical training boosts childhood brain development.

L.A. Barometer survey
The LABarometer survey will regularly engage with the same group of Los Angeles County residents over time, tracking how their individual lives change in the face of L.A.’s dynamic environment. (Photo/iStock)

High cost of living dampens L.A. County residents’ attitudes

The new LABarometer from USC Dornsife’s Center for Economic and Social Research finds county residents less satisfied with their lives and less optimistic about the economy than people living elsewhere in the country.

kilauea algae
Scientists initially noticed that ocean water around the volcano was turning green by looking at NASA‘s satellite photos of the eruption. The green color turned out to be chlorophyll from the algae bloom. (Photo/U.S. Coast Guard)

1 billion tons of lava spark algae bloom in North Pacific Ocean

Not only did the Kīlauea volcano pour tons upon tons of lava into the ocean last year, but its eruption set off an unusual effect: an algae super bloom. USC Dornsife researchers found out why.