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Call Goes Out for Honorary Degree Nominations

Thomas L. Henyey, chair of USC’s Honorary Degrees Committee is calling for names of distinguished individuals to be considered for an honorary degree at future spring commencements.

The honorary degree is the highest award that USC confers and is given to honor individuals who have distinguished themselves through extraordinary achievements in scholarship, the professions or other creative activities; to honor alumni and other individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the welfare and development of USC or the communities of which they are a part; to recognize exceptional acts of philanthropy to the university; and to elevate the university in the eyes of the world by honoring individuals who are widely known and highly regarded for achievements in their respective fields of endeavor.

Any USC faculty, staff, student, alumni member or trustee may nominate a potential candidate.

For information on the honorary degree nomination process, to learn how to make a nomination or for submission deadlines, go to https://www.usc.edu/admin/provost/honorarydegrees.

Nominations should be submitted to: Thomas Henyey, Chair of the Honorary Degrees Committee, c/o the Office of the Provost, ADM 203, MC 4019. For information, call Janet K. Chaudhuri, associate provost, at (213) 740-6713.

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