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Labyrinth Grant Completes ‘Einstein’ Funding

The “Three Winters” installation, which explores the semesters Einstein spent at Caltech in Pasadena from 1931-1933, has been an integral part of the Skirball’s Einstein exhibit, which opened last September and runs through May 29.

The Labyrinth Project, an award-winning art collective and research initiative at the USC Annenberg Center for Communication, has received a $50,000 grant from the trustees of the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

The grant will complete funding for the DVD-ROM version of the group’s interactive museum installation “Three Winters in the Sun: Einstein in California.”

The “Three Winters” installation, which explores the semesters Einstein spent at Caltech in Pasadena from 1931-1933, has been an integral part of the Skirball’s Einstein exhibit, which opened last September and runs through May 29.

A longer DVD version of “Three Winters,” which encompasses the museum installation material, plus hundreds of new additions of moving and still images, along with music and other audio tracks, is being publicly presented at the Skirball on Jan. 23, from 2 to 5 p.m., and will go on sale in February. It will be available through the USC Bookstore and Amazon.com.

The Labyrinth installation uses the brief period the famed scientist was in Southern California as an opportunity to re-envision his entire life.

The unique interface designed by the Labyrinth team exposes visitors to an abstract representation of a universe made of light particles that lead viewers through an array of archival materials.

The installation also includes original interviews with a wide range of commentators, among them Einstein’s granddaughter, Evelyn Einstein; physicist Edward Witten, one of the world’s leading string theorists; and USC University Professor Leo Braudy, an expert on fame.

“We are creating a multi-perspective portrait that stresses the many paradoxes surrounding Einstein and the way he was seen as a cultural icon,” said Labyrinth Director Marsha Kinder, a critical studies professor in the USC School of Cinema-Television.

The design, she said, is inspired by Einstein’s theory of relativity, enabling people to engage with a variety of interwoven narratives.

“Instead of trying to present a definitive view of the man, we explore his interactions with six different communities: his own household, science, �migr�s, Jews, Hollywood and the FBI � which opened a file that eventually amassed over 1,400 pages on his political activities.”

For an earlier story on the “Three Winters’ installation, click here.

Labyrinth Grant Completes ‘Einstein’ Funding

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