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Jonathan Samet and Edward Crandall of the Keck School of Medicine of USC were named to a National Academies committee developing and monitoring the topic “A Research Strategy for Environmental, Health and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials” on Dec. 30.

Samet will chair the committee.

DUBAI DOINGS

For the second year in a row, USC Davis School of Gerontology Dean Gerald C. Davison traveled to Dubai to participate in the Summit on the Global Agenda.

The Nov. 20-22 meeting brought together world leaders from academia, business, government and society with the purpose of advancing solutions to critical challenges facing the globe.

Councils made up of 15 to 30 representatives focused on climate change, financial risk, fragile states, chronic disease and malnutrition, among other issues.

MUSIC MAKER

USC Thornton School of Music doctoral candidate Lesley Leighton has been appointed assistant conductor of the Los Angeles Master Chorale.

The one-year term will begin July 1.

Leighton sang with the chorale from 1991 to 1997 before moving to New York City, where she was director of development for the office of Mayor Michael Bloomberg. She rejoined the group in 2007.

At USC, she is working on a doctor of musical arts in choral music.

HIGH SOCIETY

Tzung Hsiai, associate professor of biomedical engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, one of the nation’s oldest and most respected medical honor societies.

Membership recognizes physician-scientists for their outstanding records of scholarly achievement in biomedical research.

A physician and biomedical engineer, Hsiai is applying micro- and nano-scale technologies to address fundamental cardiovascular questions.

He is currently developing a sensor to help clinicians distinguish cardiac emergencies requiring immediate surgery from chronic problems that can be managed with drugs and/or a change in lifestyle.

Hsiai is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine Cardiovascular Disease.

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